Monthly Archives: August 2015

ANATOMY OF A GOLF SWING

August 26, 2015

golf-swing

With today’s modern golf swing, there are numerous muscle groups and joints which need to be on the same page to best provide one with an effective, powerful stroke while minimizing the risk of injury. An often neglected part of the body with regards to many players’ swings is the hip joint and its surrounding structures.

Prevention

Placing focus on properly preparing the hip joint to maintain appropriate flexibility will best ensure that it can withstand the forces seen with one’s golf swing. Basic stretching exercises for the hamstrings, hip flexors, and rotators are essential. The average PGA golfer has roughly 45° of hip internal rotation. Lacking internal rotation leads to increased extension of a golfer’s pelvis which can result in low back pain and decreased drive. In addition, recent studies have shown that golfers with strong hip musculature have lower handicaps and longer driving distances compared to those with weak hip muscles. Combined with safe core strengthening, these steps will help one produce the maximum power with their swing while reducing the risk of back and other joint injuries.

Causes

Hip pain in golfers may be the result of minor strains, soft-tissue inflammation, such as bursitis, and even arthritis. The modern golf swing, with its requirement for large amounts of body rotation, can subject one’s body and hip joint to perhaps more than it can tolerate, rendering it vulnerable to injury. Labral tears, while perhaps more common in other sports, can also be a cause of hip pain in golfers. A stabilizing and supportive structure, the labrum can be damaged when subjected to increased pressure in a hip joint which lacks the necessary flexibility to withstand the forces seen with the modern golf swing. This may result in groin pain, clicking or locking sensations, discomfort when squatting to read a putt or pick up a ball, or even restricting one’s swing.

Treatment

The first steps to take in treating hip pain associated with golf involve the usual conservative measures, including rest, ice, and over the counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications. If these fail to alleviate the discomfort, formal physical therapy with an experienced provider familiar with golf related injuries can often target the specific muscle imbalances and tightness which made one prone to such an issue in the first place. Injections, such as steroid and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), can also be useful for a variety of hip related pathologies. Lastly, when non-operative treatments fail, surgery can be considered. For labral tears, recent advances in hip arthroscopy have enabled surgeons to repair this important anatomic structure through minimally invasive techniques, and best preserve the hip joint for countless rounds of future golf.

Our commitment at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  Trevor Born, MD is fellowship trained in Sports Medicine at SOA and will help you get back in the game. Same day appointments are available at any our three locations by calling 941.951.2663.

This entry was posted in on August 26, 2015 by sarasotaAdmin.

SEND IN THE CLOWNS … THE 24 HOUR GIVING CHALLENGE

August 17, 2015

GivingChallenge-SOA-REVISED

A few months ago, we announced our official orthopedic partnership with the Circus Arts Conservatory (CAC). You may wonder what orthopedics has to do with a circus.

The obvious answer is the circus is comprised of athletic performers and SOA specializes in Sports Medicine, so it’s a PERFECT match.  MOST important, SOA supports the educational aspect of the CAC. When people think of the CAC, they first think of spectacular entertainment.  What many don’t realize is the phenomenal contribution the CAC makes to our community from their Education curriculum. Did you know:

  • the Circus Education program teaches in 15 area schools across Manatee and Sarasota Counties
  • 80% of ticket revenue supports community outreach
  • Sarasota is known as  the Circus Capital of the World
  • the CAC Circus Education program teaches Newton’s physics, law of Universal Gravitation, through juggling
  • the CAC donates over 5,000 tickets annually to over 50 non-profit organizations
  • they depend on 300 volunteers annually to run their programs
  • their educational program is designed to include students who would otherwise not respond to traditional instruction
  • their outreach program proves when children are actively engaged, they are able to understand
  • their Humor Therapy educational program goes far beyond entertainment, improving the quality of life for those in hospitals and ALFs…Humor Heals
  • the Humor Therapy team made 368 visits to local care facilities this year
  • physical activity in children = higher academic achievement in school … Circus Education reaches out to grades K-8

 Wow, that’s a lot … and there’s so much more as to how the Circus Arts Conservatory reaches out to folks of all socio-economic circumstances, ethnicities, gender, and ages.

So why are we telling you this?  The Circus Arts Conservatory needs our help and we need yours. Beginning September 1st and continuing for 24 hours, the CAC will participate in the 2015 Giving Challenge. Over 400 local non-profit organizations work tirelessly without sleep to garner donations for their cause as well as vie for grant money through the Community Foundation of Sarasota and the Patterson Foundation. Over the past three years, the Giving Challenge has raised over $8 million dollars for local non-profits. Special grants will be awarded for Most New Donors, Best Overall Campaign, Best Video, and Best Business Partnership … as the CAC Business Partner, SOA is encouraging all our patients, staff, family, friends, and social media followers to join the challenge.

On September 1st at noon (not before!), please go online to www.circusarts.org/givingchallenge and make a donation.  This year, new online donations between $25 and $250 will be matched, making your gift even more important.   At the online site, you will be able to follow the 2015 Giving Challenge leaderboard of all the local non-profits to see how much is being raised in real time.  For a closer look at the CAC educational program, watch this video:  https://vimeo.com/134961942   … then donate on September 1st.  Everyone one of us at SOA appreciates your participation … WE APPLAUD YOU FOR HELPING!

This entry was posted in on August 17, 2015 by sarasotaAdmin.

CONCUSSION: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

August 10, 2015

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What is it and what causes it? Concussion in sports involves a complex process whereby trauma induced to the body or head creates abnormalities in processing of the brain.  While most people believe that a concussion requires a direct hit to the head, many athletes can develop a concussion even from blows to the body, which involve a sudden acceleration or deceleration force.  An estimated 3.8 million concussions occur in the US during recreational and competitive play with many more going unreported.

What are the symptoms of concussion? The symptoms from a concussion are extremely variable and no one concussion is the same as another.  Many athletes will experience headache, fogginess, dizziness, sleep difficulties, irritability, and difficulty concentrating just to name a few. Unfortunately, the symptoms of dizziness and fogginess can be associated with a longer time to recover completely.

Who is at risk of a concussion? Unfortunately some athletes may be a greater risk for a experiencing a concussion.  Younger athletes, female athletes, athletes with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD) as well as those who have experienced a previous concussion are at greatest risk for experiencing a concussion.

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How are concussions treated? This area of sports medicine continues to evolve and clinicians are changing the way concussions are managed.  With appropriate history, physical examination, and testing, clinicians are better able to gear specific treatment strategies towards an athlete’s symptoms.  While 90% of athletes will recover from a concussion in 3-4 weeks with relative rest and modifying aggravating activities, the other 10% may need dedicated rehabilitation strategies to help them overcome symptoms.  Once an athlete is symptom free, they can begin a graded exercise program that helps return them back to the sport safely.

At SARASOTA ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATES we have physicians who are trained at identifying high school athletic concussions and are able to recommend appropriate treatments, which will help them get back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

PAUL LENTO, MD / FAAPMR (click here for more on Dr Lento) / Triple Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Sports Rehabilitation

 

This entry was posted in on August 10, 2015 by sarasotaAdmin.