Monthly Archives: February 2016

GETTING TO KNOW YOU – Paul Lento, MD

February 15, 2016

SOAStudio-133

Last week we featured Dr Michael Gordon. This week, we asked the same questions of Paul Lento, MD, a triple board certified Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation physician here at SOA.

What inspired you to become a physician?

Not so much “what” but “who”.  My father had a pretty strong influence on my decision. He often talked that I should choose a career to help improve people’s lives but was also challenging. I thought medicine would be the best avenue to achieve both of these goals.

Why Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R)?

While I was a General Medical Officer in the Navy taking care of Marines, I realized most of the personnel I saw had non-surgical orthopedic injuries, which often improved with a good rehabilitation program. PM&R focuses on several non-surgical options while treating the entire person, not just one body part.

What do you love most about your job?

Probably learning about the interesting things my patients have done in life. I have seen patients who have played professional tennis to those who taught Vivien Leigh how to talk with a southern drawl. One patient of mine was a bomber pilot in WWII.  Truly amazing people.

(Editorial Note: For the “younger” folks, Vivien Leigh was best known for her two Academy Award winning roles from classic movies as Scarlet O’Hara in “Gone With The Wind” and Blanche DuBois in “Streetcar Named Desire”.)

What is your biggest challenge?

Explaining to patients that I’m not an orthopedic physician. People look at me like I must be from another planet. The specialty of PM&R is very small and not well-known but I chose it as I think it has a lot to offer patients.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a _____________.

Fishing boat captain or a bartender on a beach in St. Barths.  Who knows, maybe combine the two when I retire?

Your proudest moment?

The times when I see my kids being kind to other people.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

While I’ve been to different countries, I would have to say Salt Lake City during the 2002 Winter Olympics. I saw and met people from all over the world. It was like circling the globe in two weeks without having to leave the U.S.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

I love to fish. I would try to fish in any body of water if given the chance. It’s one of the reasons I moved to Florida.

What’s your next adventure?

I may explore Italy in the next year or two if I can get away.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Having lived in both Chicago and Philadelphia, I would have to say deep dish pizza and soft pretzels.

Paul Lento, MD is triple board certified and a Castle Connelly “Top Doc”.  You may read his medical biography by visiting our website here. To make an appointment with Dr Lento, call 941-951-2663. Sarasota Orthopedic Associates has 13 physicians across 4 locations (Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, Venice, and Bradenton) and we offer same day appointments when needed. Our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

This entry was posted in on February 15, 2016 by sarasotaAdmin.

GETTING TO KNOW YOU –Michael Gordon, MD

February 9, 2016

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Over the next several weeks we’ll be asking each of our physicians to reveal a more personal side that extends beyond their medical biography. This week, we spoke with Dr Michael Gordon, who is Fellowship Trained and Board Certified in treating hands, wrists, shoulders, and elbows and sees adults and children of all ages.

What inspired you to become a physician?

I wanted to be able to help people in a tangible and meaningful way. I enjoyed creating and tinkering with and fixing things as a child. You could say I was the neighborhood mechanic. I even built a boat with my father as a summer project.

Why orthopedics?

It’s most similar to architecture, mechanics, and carpentry, and, provides gratification of fixing or restoring function to the anatomy. When I considered applying to medical school, I shadowed an orthopedic surgeon and watched him return the ability of walking to people. It was very inspiring.

What do you love most about your job?

Seeing the faces of joy and gratitude when patients have recovered from their injury or condition.

What is your biggest challenge?

Not having enough time.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a ________.

Rock Star

Editorial Note:  Dr Gordon plays guitar and sings in the band “McDreamy and the Anatomy”, a group consisting solely of physicians! The band competed at the “DR IDOL” fundraising event for Boys & Girls Club a few years ago when they rocked the crowd and won the title.

SOA_Idol_0081

Your proudest moment?

Becoming and being a father to two amazing daughters.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled?  Why?

I’m not fond of trying to name the “best”, “favorite”, or “most” because there are so many great places. I would say Thailand, Japan, and Israel were culturally interesting, but Europe is wonderful too. The US has amazing resources that we sometimes forget like the Grand Canyon and Yosemite.

Any hobbies?  Activities?

Music, Music, Music. Exercise has also become a central part of my life.

SOA_Bike_035

What’s your next adventure?

I’d like to make it to the Great Barrier Reef for scuba diving. I haven’t made definite plans, but it’s on my list. Also the Red Sea.

Your guilty pleasure food?

Cheetos.

You can read Dr Gordon’s professional biography by clicking here.  Michael Gordon, MD is one of thirteen physicians at Sarasota Orthopedic Associates.  With three locations and same day appointments, our commitment is to get our patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

This entry was posted in on February 9, 2016 by sarasotaAdmin.

CHECK THESE ORTHOPEDIC “A to Z’s” … How many do you know?

February 3, 2016

hand xray

At times, orthopedic terms can sound like a foreign language. We thought it would be fun to compile a list of one orthopedic term for each letter of the alphabet. Take a look and see if you’ve heard of these:

  • Arthroscopy – a minimally invasive surgical procedure on a joint where an exam and/or treatment is performed through a tiny incision.
  • Bursa – a fluid filled sac providing a cushion between bone and tendons or muscles.
  • Cubital Tunnel Syndrome – pressure on the ulnar nerve (better known as your funny bone), one of the main nerves of the hand.
  • DOMS – Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or pain and stiffness felt several hours after strenuous exercising.
  • Eccentric – the motion of a muscle as it is lengthening; the opposite of concentric, or shortening.
  • Fascia – a sheet of connective tissue below the skin that separates muscles or organs.
  • Gout – most commonly affected at the big toe, inflammatory arthritis caused by elevated uric acid in the blood; more prevalent in men.
  • Heterotopic Ossification – the presence of bone in soft tissue where it would not normally exist.
  • Impingement Syndrome – when the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles become irritated, resulting in pain, weakness, and loss of shoulder movement.
  • Jones Fracture – occurs in the small area of the small toe that is prone to healing challenges due to less blood flow.
  • Kyphosis – abnormally convex curvature of the spine.
  • Lordosis – the inward curvature of the spine.
  • Meniscus – tissue that serves to disperse friction in the knee joint when moving.
  • Neuropathy – disease or dysfunction of nerves (sensory, motor or autonomic) causing numbness or weakness.
  • Osteoarthritis – the most common form of arthritis occurring when the protective cartilage wears down.
  • Plantar Fasciitis – a disorder of the heel and bottom of the foot causing pain, usually upon taking first steps of the day or after a rest.
  • Q -?
  • Referred Pain – pain perceived in a location different from that of the pathology.
  • Strain vs Sprain – partial tear of a muscle vs partial or complete tear of a ligament.
  • Tendinitis vs Tendinosis – “itis” occurs when the body detects an injury and responds with increased blood flow to the tendon; “osis” is a degenerative injury with repetitive stress over time.
  • Ultrasound – sound waves with ultra- high frequencies above the limit of hearing, allowing resolution of small internal details in tissue.
  • Viscosupplementation – a procedure where a fluid, hyaluronate, is injected into the joint to provide relief and movement.
  • W Sitting (pediatric) – a sitting position discouraged in children causing abnormal stress on hips and knees during growth.
  • X-rays – electromagnetic waves that are able pass through a part of the body to show internal composition, shown as a photographic or digital image.
  • Y – ?
  • Zika – a once rare mosquito born disease; though not orthopedic, the bite can cause joint pain; currently ranking high in the news as it spreads into several countries including USA.

So, how many did you already know? Do you have an orthopedic related term for the missing letters ”Q” or “Y”?

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers same day appointments at our three locations of Sarasota, Lakewood Ranch, and Venice.  Our 13 physicians are committed to get you back on your feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

This entry was posted in on February 3, 2016 by sarasotaAdmin.