Monthly Archives: January 2018

DO YOU HAVE RUNNER’S KNEE?

January 29, 2018

RUNNERS

Avid runners can experience pain for a number of reasons, from simple trauma (banging the leg against something) to muscle spasms (usually the result of improper stretching). When running and jogging are consistently painful, however, the problem could be runner’s knee. Exercise enthusiasts should always pay attention to pain and respond accordingly. Before panicking over persistent knee pain, however, it’s important to understand what runner’s knee is and how to recognize it.

Recognizing Runner’s Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), the medical term for runner’s knee, is a persistent irritation localized at the juncture of the patella and femur—the “top” side of the kneecap. It’s commonly associated with running and jogging, hence its lay name. PFPS is characterized by a dull knee pain that sufferers describe as “behind” or “around” the top of the kneecap.

Exercise and activity can aggravate runner’s knee injuries, particularly when the direction is downhill such as descending stairs or running on a decline. Squatting and sitting for long periods can also be problematic for people dealing with PFPS. There is likely also knee pain associated with resisting leg extensions. The kneecap itself may be adversely sensitive to pressure.

PFPS vs. Patellar Tendonitis

As noted above, PFPS produces pain localized on the upper side of the kneecap. If the pain manifests “inside” or “below” the kneecap, the condition in question is more likely patellar tendonitis—an inflammation of the tendon connecting the patella to the shin muscle. Patellar tendonitis results from a different kind of injury than does PFPS, though the only sure way to get a diagnosis is by meeting with a certified doctor, preferably an orthopedist.

Misconceptions About PFPS

PFPS can strike anyone who actively and/or aggressively uses the legs and knees for work or recreation. While less common among active children, there is a higher tendency for this kind of knee pain among women runners. The reasons for this correlation remain unclear; however, recent research has disproven the so-called “Q-angle” theory that the wider hips of female physiology render women more susceptible to runner’s knee.

In the last decade, science focused on PFPS has discovered that the knee actually moves differently during runs or squats than it seems to the person exercising. Although it feels like the kneecap “tracks” outward when running or squatting, it’s actually the femur that is rotating above and around the patella. This fact explains why PFPS sufferers generally also have weakened hip abductor and external rotator muscles. In fact, the most successful physical therapy regimens for runner’s knee all involve strengthening these muscles to help stabilize knee movement and reduce irritation.

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates offers customized pain management treatment plans for runners and athletes throughout the Gulf Coast of Florida. Fill out our contact form to schedule your appointment today.

With three convenient locations we are able to offer same/next day appointments when needed.  Like us on Facebook here. Follow us on Twitter here.

This entry was posted in on January 29, 2018 by sarasotaAdmin.

THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO PROPER FITNESS STRETCHING

January 3, 2018

stretching

Stretching is an important part of any physical activity for casual fitness fans and seasoned athletes alike. Engaging in proper stretching of the muscles before working out may help decrease the risk of pain from an injury, improve range of motion, and even improve performance. Here are four expert techniques to try.

  1. Warm up Before Stretching

One of the biggest exercise misconceptions is that stretching constitutes a warm-up. In fact, it’s important to warm up muscles with 5 to 10 minutes of light walking or jogging before stretching. Stretching cold muscles can easily cause an injury.

  1. Stretch After a Workout

Stretching after a workout may also assist with pain and injury prevention. Because muscles are already warm from exercise, this type of stretching provides optimal benefits. Working out increases circulation to the muscles and joints, so individuals are at their most flexible following exercise.

  1. Try Dynamic Stretching

The traditional stretch, a static stretch, involves extending the muscle to its greatest capacity and holding the pose for up to 30 seconds. The stretch should be released if pain occurs. Another effective stretching technique is the dynamic stretch, in which the muscle group is continuously stretched through its full range of motion with smooth, ongoing movements. For example, use the same moves that will be used during the planned workout, but at a lower intensity and slower speed.

  1. Consult a Trainer

Those who are new to working out should consider visiting a personal trainer. These experts will demonstrate how to stretch muscles safely and correctly to minimize the risk of pain and injury while exercising.

Sarasota Orthopedic Associates can provide treatment for many types of sports injuries. We offer physical therapy services to help improve flexibility, strength, and range of motion. With three convenient locations that offer same-day or next-day appointments, our patients experience efficient diagnoses to help them return to their normal lifestyle. Contact us today to schedule an appointment.

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This entry was posted in on January 3, 2018 by sarasotaAdmin.