Monthly Archives: September 2018

DON’T LET BACK PAIN RUIN YOUR GOLF GAME

September 13, 2018

golf feet

While an estimated 75% of people will experience some form of back pain at some point in their life, that number is even higher among golfers. Pro golfers and weekend warriors are both subject to the pain. There are ways to avoid back pain, and, non-invasive treatments if it does happen to you.

Some of the more common causes of back pain in golfers are rotational stress from an improper swing, overextension, pivoting/twisting of the hips, and muscle spasms from overuse. Those with prior history of back injury or pain are at higher risk of re-injury. Deficits of hip range of motion as well as lumbar extension are also common in golfers with back pain. Research studies that have looked at differences seen in golfers with back pain versus pain-free golfers have shown statistically significant differences in techniques. Specifically what was observed is greater spine flexion when addressing the ball and less trunk rotation compared to pain free golfers who had twice as much trunk flexion velocity. That greater spine flexion versus trunk rotation increases risk of back injury.

There are simple solutions to avoid back pain in golfers:

  • Proper stretching and warm up prior to play
  • Strengthening back and shoulder muscles on days not in play
  • Knowledgeable coach/trainer to correct your swing
  • Correct fitting footwear
  • Cut back on number of days per week
  • Avoid playing a full round after a long hiatus from playing

At home remedies for reducing discomfort include icing, rest, or NSAIDS.

If your pain is not resolved after a few days, it may be time to see an Interventional Pain Management Physician for a non-surgical or minimally invasive solution. Some of the methods might include:

    • Injections. This may include injection of an anesthetic, a steroid, or both.
    • Radiofrequency ablation. This is used as an option to stop back pain that has become chronic and is no longer responding to injections.
    • SCS (spinal cord stimulation). Another option to stop chronic pain especially back pain that comes with severe pain in the legs.

At 360-ORTHOPEDICS, we have three locations and offer same day appointments.  Ashot Kotcharian, MD is a PM&R physician with a specialty in  Interventional Spine & Sports Medicine. With proper attention and treatment for the discomfort, you can get back in the game with minimal down time. Fore!

This entry was posted in on September 13, 2018 by sarasotaAdmin.

BUILD YOUR GAME FROM THE GROUND UP

September 4, 2018

golf stance

A powerful, and effective golf swing starts with a stable foundation. From a solid foundation the entire swing can be leveraged and a low handicap status can be achieved. The important but often overlooked foundation, are pain free and well-functioning feet and ankles. While there is a lot of discussion about back, hip and knee injuries in golf, most golf instructors will tell you that the power of a swing is created “from the ground up”.

Injuries to the great toe

At the end of follow through, the great toe of the dominant foot experiences an increase in pressure. This can cause a jamming of the toe into the top of the shoebox. With repetition, the area under the toenail can become injured causing blood to form or the nail to lift from the nail bed. These types of injuries should not be taken lightly. Even though the toe is a small portion of the body, if not treated injuries to this area can cause significant pain, infection and loss of function. Wearing proper fitting shoes and adjustments in the golf swing to prevent the irritation of the nail is necessary to eliminate recurrence.

Ankle Instability

Stability is an important factor in performance in both accuracy and distance, and is also a contributor to the amount of power generated. The lower body needs to be the stable foundation for the upper body during the rotation required for the backswing and the trail foot is expected to remain relatively stable during this rotation. The lateral, or outside of the ankle is a common site of injury for golfers and other athletes alike. Repetitive strain will cause laxity of the lateral ankle ligaments and predispose that ankle to easier spraining. Sprains of the ligaments can lead to weakness and a lack of stability in the golf swing and while walking on the uneven terrain of a golf course.

Golfing is a highly coordinated sport that, by its nature, is associated with risk of repetitive motion injuries. Being intentional about maintaining good foot form and taking care of a stable foundation can keep golfers free of injury and enjoy years on the course.

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Dr Jemaar Graham is a Board Certified Foot and Ankle Podiatrist at 360-ORTHOPEDICS treating all related problems related to the foot and ankle with both surgical and conservative modalities. He joins the mission of SOA to get his patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.

This entry was posted in on September 4, 2018 by sarasotaAdmin.