Four Tips for Running Again After an Injury

After a serious injury, you should work closely with an orthopedic doctor to carefully plan a return to running. While limiting activity too much can compromise strength, endurance, and flexibility, getting back to your regular regimen too soon can result in reinjury. These tips can help you facilitate a safe return to running after joint, muscle, or tendon damage.

After a serious injury, you should work closely with an orthopedic doctor to carefully plan a return to running. While limiting activity too much can compromise strength, endurance, and flexibility, getting back to your regular regimen too soon can result in reinjury. These tips can help you facilitate a safe return to running after joint, muscle, or tendon damage.

Engage in Low-Impact Exercises

Diversify your workout regimen once your doctor says it’s safe to do so. Pilates, yoga, strength training, and cycling all prepare your soft tissues and joints for the rigor of running. In addition to cross-training, appointments with a physical therapist can help you return to your previous level of activity.

Forget Peak Performance

If you try to hit your personal record for running a 10k right away, you’re setting yourself up for frustration. Instead, set new goals that account for how long you’ve been recovering. This strategy provides achievable milestones to help keep you motivated.

For an injury that kept you from running for more than three months, start your workout plan from scratch. Increase your mileage by no more than 10% each week to help prevent reinjury. For shorter-term injuries, you can begin with half of your usual distance.

Limit Your Use of Pain Medications

Though over-the-counter pain medications can help you manage discomfort, they also make it more difficult to gauge your body’s response to exercising. Start with less strenuous workouts and manage aches and pains with rest, ice, compression, and elevation. As your body gets more comfortable with running, these issues should decrease.

If you’ve suffered an injury that hasn’t responded to treatments you’re tried at home, you should consult a medical professional. The staff at 360 Orthopedics is comprised of orthopedic doctors, physical therapists, and other providers with extensive training in sports medicine. We can evaluate your injury and work on a recovery plan to help you get back to running. To schedule a consultation at one of our three locations in the Sarasota area, call 941-951-2663 or request your appointment online.

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