Monthly Archives: August 2017

SUGAR & DRUG ABUSE? Winning the War

August 29, 2017

sugar heroin

Recent studies have found that sugar can be as addictive as cocaine or alcohol according to the US National Institute on Drug Abuse. For some people, eating foods high in sugar may produce chemical changes in the brain’s “reward” center causing addictive cravings. Sugar is sugar … don’t be fooled by replacing white table sugar with honey, agave, or brown sugar. Those may have some nutritional value, but they are still sugar with calories and addictive qualities. In fact, sugar overuse may sometimes lead to problems other than addiction like diabetes and liver disease.

SUGAR IN TWO FORMS

  • Free sugars are those added to food and liquids whether at the table, in the kitchen, or at the manufacturer. Free sugar is the form we need to cut down on consumption. Identifying these sugars can be difficult since they appear in many different forms like agave, raw sugar, cane sugar, corn syrup, fructose, sucrose, molasses, glucose, dextrose, coconut sugar, and honey.
  • Natural sugars are those found in fresh, frozen, or dried fruits and vegetables. They are also found in dairy products like milk, plain yogurt, and cheese.

WHAT FREE SUGAR DOES TO OUR BODIES

Consuming excessive sugar over long periods of time stimulates our brain activity and hormone levels. This increases glucose levels which lead to the pancreas releasing insulin. This causes the body to retain calories as fat, causing weight gain. Carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, chips, and fries process slower than free sugar, however, still break down into sugar. The result: the excess weight puts strain on our joints and we crave more sugar.

Since these sugary foods stimulate the same areas of the brain as drugs of abuse, they may cause loss of control over consumption and cravings. Currently the average American consumes almost 20 teaspoons of sugar every day; that’s over 65 pounds of sugar a year, per person!

SO HOW DO WE WIN THIS WAR?

  • The World Health Organization recommends a maximum of 10% and ideally less than 5% of our calories be consumed from added or natural sugar. For the average person per day, the recommendation is 6 teaspoons for women and 9 teaspoons for men.
  • Read labels; food labels list ingredients in descending order. If sugar or a form of sugar is in the first 3 ingredients, put it back on the shelf.
  • The same goes for a packaged food with more than one sugar listed — put it back!
  • Eliminate soft drinks and fruit juices; they are jam packed with sugar.
  • Limit consumption of candy, baked goods, and desserts to special occasions.
  • “Low fat” packaged foods often compensate with extra sugar; read the label.
  • Eat fresh fruit rather than canned which have added syrup containing sugar.
  • Protein such as eggs, beans, and nuts can help control sugar cravings.
  • Eliminate sugars from your diet s-l-o-w-l-y; don’t go “cold turkey”.
  • Drink water!

The good news is that when cutting back, no math or calorie counting is involved in eliminating sugar. Try replacing sugar with tempting flavors like ginger, lemon, vanilla bean, nutmeg, or cinnamon.  Bottom line, the easiest way to cut back is to avoid processed sugar whenever possible and eat fresh fruits instead.

Taking care of our bodies through eating well and proper exercise is paramount to healthy bones and muscles. If you experience pain or discomfort in your joints or muscles, give us a call at 941-951-2663 for an appointment. At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates we have four locations and offer same day appointments when needed.

sugar

Sources: WebMD; Authority Nutrition; American Diabetes Association; US National Institute on Drug Abuse; World Health Organization

 

This entry was posted in on August 29, 2017 by sarasotaAdmin.

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH JULIE GLADDEN BARRE, MD

August 22, 2017

We are so proud to introduce you to Orthopedic Surgeon, Julie Gladden Barre, MD.  Dr. Barre has a specialty in Sports Medicine and treats all ages from high school athletes to  couch potatoes to weekend warriors to professional athletes. You may find her professional bio on our website, however, we wanted to  spend a few minutes with Dr. Barre and get to know her on a more personal level.  Read about it here:

Barre headshot color

What inspired you to become a physician?

Since I was very young I have always had compassion for those in need and this carried into my initial professional calling as a physical therapist. I loved helping people who had been through an injury or surgery and eventually when drawn into management, my love of patient care continued to lure me back to hands on treatment of those in need. I then decided to return to school and become a physician.

Why orthopedics?

With my unique background as a therapist I understood the process of those who were injured requiring surgery and the often grueling process required to get back to what brings someone joy in life. The human body and the increasing active lifestyle of people in today’s world is what has always fascinated me and propelled my love of Orthopedics.

What do you love most about your job?

I love meeting people every day and finding out about their lives and occupations. My job is so satisfying and I thoroughly enjoy being able to help get people back on their feet again as well as help them get back to their normal activities of daily living or get back on the field or golf course or tennis court.

What is your biggest challenge?

One of the hardest things to deal with in the field of medicine is when tragedy happens and seeing people go through physical and emotional pain. As a physician it is hard not to feel the pain that patients and their loved ones go through. I like to encourage my patients and establish a team approach so that I am with them every step of the process.

If I weren’t an orthopedic physician I’d be a_______.

I can’t imagine not being a physician, however if I had to choose something it would be a chef. Everyone loves food and I thoroughly enjoy pleasing people through creativity in the kitchen.

Your proudest / happiest moment?

I think my proudest and happiest moment is when I had my son during the 4th year of my orthopedic residency. Residency is a grueling time in life and after going through a full 9 month pregnancy during residency, the morning my son was born was one of the most joyful times in my life.

Where is the most interesting place you’ve travelled? Why?

Guatemala. I helped a medical team during a medical mission trip in college and I was so moved by the people in Central America and how grateful they were for the medical care they received.

Any hobbies? Activities?

Beach activities with family, cooking, travel, attending sporting events, exercise.

 What’s your next adventure?

I would love to take a trip to Europe with my family someday.

Your guilty pleasure food?

A really good coffee and French pastry.

Dr Barre is aligned with the mission of Sarasota Orthopedic Associates to get her patients back on their feet, back to work, back in the game, and back to life.  SOA has three locations and offers same day or next appointments when needed. Check the website at www.SOA.md or call 941-951-BONE (2663) for more information.

This entry was posted in on August 22, 2017 by sarasotaAdmin.

SURGEON ON A MISSION

August 7, 2017

At Sarasota Orthopedic Associates, we believe in supporting our community in many ways and we encourage our staff to do so as well. Our spine surgeon, Dr Andrew Moulton, goes a step further and shares his skills globally to help children in developing countries. Our local newspaper recently interviewed him to learn more about his mission as co-founder of the Butterfly Foundation.  Read about it here:

Moulton Surgical Team

Dr. Andrew Moulton is a nationally recognized expert in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal disorders and a surgeon at Sarasota Orthopedics Associates. He is also the founder of the Butterfly Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children with complex spinal deformity in developing countries.

Since 2003, Dr. Moulton has performed dozens of living-saving surgeries, while promoting the advancement of spine deformity treatment technology by training local surgeons. We spoke to him recently about his philanthropic work. Visit www.SOA.md for more information.

What inspired you to start the Butterfly Foundation?

As an orthopedic resident, I visited Honduras on a pediatric mission in which many club foot surgeries were performed. The next trip, there were more patients than before. I looked at the demographics and realized that the procedures themselves were a drop in the bucket compared to the size of the problem, and then decided to focus on training local surgeons. “Teach a man to fish and he feeds his community for a lifetime” is our motto.

Where are some of the places the foundation serves?

We have ongoing efforts in the Dominican Republic, Malawi, Chile, Peru, Jamaica, Vietnam, China and Myanmar.

What kind of spinal injuries or illnesses have you treated?

We treat primarily pediatric deformities, including spinal injuries and severe, life-threatening cases of scoliosis.

Moulton pt    Moulton spine film

Where did the name “Butterfly Foundation” come from?

Because of society’s attitudes toward their deformity, we saw how these kids would come in, bundled up, socially withdrawn, embarrassed, even outcast. Once they have their surgeries and heal, they stand up straight, they run, and they jump and play. There’s such a profound joy to see them move so freely, without pain. Their transformation reminded us of how a butterfly is born and the name stuck.

What was your most memorable case?

The most memorable case may have been one of the first very extensive ones. After a 15-hour surgery, with my hands bleeding from blisters acquired over the week of surgeries, I sat in a corner waiting over an hour for the patient to wake up to ensure she was not paralyzed from the surgery. She woke up in great shape. I slept well that night!

What inspires you to continue doing this work?

Doing this work takes me back to the basics of being a doctor — to why I wanted to become one in the first place. These people don’t have many chances in life. For me to give a little means a lot to them. When the people thank you, they really mean it. You’re the only chance they have.

How can our readers become involved with your foundation?

People are welcome to email inquiries to info@SOA.md.

Moulton photo

SOURCE: Herald Tribune/Style Magazine/Sunday, August 6, 2017

Link to article: http://sarasotaheraldtribune.fl.app.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=0b1b06237

Butterfly Foundation Facebook Page

This entry was posted in on August 7, 2017 by sarasotaAdmin.